Hillary Clinton To Win

Count us among the head scratchers. We can’t pontificate on what the latest developments in the Democratic primary/caucus calendar means. We do know that whatever the primary calendar is/will be/will not be/was supposed to be/was not supposed to be/was desired to be/was not desired to be/used to be/ leads to one inescapable conclusion: the nomination of Hillary Clinton as the Democratic Party candidate for president.

We say that not out of arrogance but because only Hillary and the Hillary Team are and have proven themselves adept at clear thinking and effective execution. If the candidates have to campaign with hats on or with one hand juggling sleeping kittens while standing on greased flagpoles only one candidate will have the poise and proven abilities to succeed: Hillary.

Roger Simon of Politico, for those interested, pontificates a bit on the latest calendar twists and turns. [The short versions of Simon’s article is that we still don’t know what the final schedule for primaries and caucuses will be.]

Neither the primary calendar nor right wing newspapers are going to derail the Hillary campaign. In fact, for all their history of effectively chopping up Democrats, the right wing in all their guises does not threaten the Hillary campaign at all. They are a spent force which the Hillary team will dispatch with ease. The remaining threat comes from our very own PINOs.

The punditocracy and many Beltway political insiders have virtually declared Senator Hillary Clinton the Democratic nominee for president for 2008. To be fair, this has not happened without some good reasons, including Mrs. Clinton’s formidable fundraising, her near-100% name recognition, her access to Bill Clinton for advice, her reputation as a brutal and efficient opponent to any rival, her strong organization, and the weakness of the field against her. [snip]

The other is the seemingly implacable opposition to her in the netroots and the left wing of her party. She did show up at the annual netrooots convention recently, but instead of pandering to their view of the war in Iraq, she stated her own more moderate view. This produced boos, but Mrs. Clinton wasn’t really directing her remarks to the netroots. She was speaking to a much larger audience and using the netroots as a foil.

The point is that, from her point of view, she does not need the netroots at all. This internet phenomenon on the left wing of the American politics has only been shown to be effective so far in raising money and in providing organizational support for candidates, neither of which she needs. In their much-publicized challenge to Senator Joe Lieberman last year, the netroots were able to conjure up an opponent, Ned Lamont, who won the Democratic
primary against the incumbent, but Mr. Lamont lost decisively in the general election which returned Mr. Lieberman to the Senate as an independent with even more influence than before.

Various Democratic politicians across the country who tried to “suck up” to the netroots by joining in the fray against Mr. Lieberman came to regret it, and to have serious reservations about the real political power of the netroots (despite its persistent self-promoting claims).

Now we have the prospects of the netroots being left out of the presidential election they have been looking forward to so much. Mrs. Clinton is not one of them. They have no real political influence with her. She is polite to their faces, but skillfully uses them to her purposes which do not include their favorite issues.

And here is the real danger from the Big Blogs, as we have pointed out in several of our previous posts, that they would rather “rule in Hell, than serve in Heaven”:

Nor are the netroots likely to go along willingly as mere afterthoughts in the 2008 presidential election. Their pride, their bragging rights, and their long-term impact is at stake.

Of course, they will denounce me for what I am saying here, as they have every time I have raised questions about their real political influence. No one denies they play a role, but after six years as a “novelty,” it will be instructive to see if the netroots can finally take their place as a major force in American national politics. That means producing not just money and organization, but, much more importantly, producing votes on election days in November.

The American voter will choose the next president not the Big Blogs. And Hillary will get the support of the voters.

Sen. Hillary Clinton has to be better than her rivals. The standard is higher for her. The reason for this isn’t her high negatives or her standing in the polls. Nor is it that Clinton-haters are numerous and boisterous. It is because she is a woman.

No citizen has ever voted for a woman for a major party’s presidential nomination with a reasonable expectation that she might wind up in the White House. The last two women to run, Elizabeth Dole and Carol Moseley Braun, vanished before the New Hampshire primary even occurred. Beginning with our 1952 primary, the first of the modern era, 221 people have received votes for president either as official candidates or as write-ins. Eight were women. Only one of the eight, Margaret Chase Smith, received more than 1,000 votes.

The older you are, the longer you have lived with a man in the White House. The older you are, the more likely you are to vote. These days, fewer people openly say they would never vote for a woman for president, but no doubt some still hold that view.

Some voters will not vote for a woman. Many others will – especially after they meet Hillary.

But because Clinton is a woman, she is also an inspiring candidate. Women young and old vest their hopes in her. Men who have witnessed the rise of women in all walks of society for four decades know it is time to consider a woman for president – if she seems qualified for the job.

Incredibly, despite her celebrity and her long run on the national stage, Clinton has maintained a zone of privacy. She has kept people from knowing the real Hillary. So what people react to, whether negatively or positively, is a public image. They see her as cold and calculating or wonky and competent. They see her as controlling – or in control.

Maybe the hardest thing for Clinton to do as a presidential candidate is to persuade voters to see her for what she is. This doesn’t mean allowing them to break through her veil so much as giving them access to her temperament, her philosophy, her experience, her preparedness for the White House.

New Hampshire is the perfect stage for this, and Clinton seems to know it. The point of her busy campaign schedule here is not to win the state’s 30-odd delegates at the Democratic National Convention, although she will take as many of them as she can get. Her hope is to change minds. Through personal campaigning, she wants to cancel voters’ preconceptions and replace them with a picture of a poised, personable, highly informed politician who would make a good president.

Here is how Hillary will win in New Hampshire:

Three factors give Clinton a special opportunity to do that in New Hampshire.

One is the state’s tradition in presidential politics. This has long been the one place, or one of two places, where voters judge candidates on the basis of a personal connection. In the early going this time around, multiple television debates and huge campaign rallies for deep-pocket candidates like Clinton have changed the dynamics of campaigning. But she, like Sen. Barack Obama, has also sought out smaller venues where she can meet voters face to face.

Clinton seems intent on leaving no hand unshaken and no question unanswered. When she came to the Monitor for an interview last week, one editor went into it expecting her to be cold and came out saying how wrong he had been. That is the response she is seeking. You can’t meet 200 million-plus potential voters across the country, but in New Hampshire, retail politics remains essential.

Another positive factor for Clinton is that the stars are aligned for her. New Hampshire was Nixon Country in 1968 when centrists dominated the Republican Party. The state is still centrist politically, but as Clinton’s husband proved in 1992, and as the popularity of Govs. Jeanne Shaheen and John Lynch has demonstrated, it is Democrats, with Independent support, who hold the center now.

The third factor is gender. New Hampshire has a long tradition of electing women to public office. In the last quarter century, only 19 states have elected a woman governor. One of them is New Hampshire, where Shaheen easily won the office in the Clinton landslide of 1996 and was twice re-elected. At the State House, women currently serve as both Senate president and House speaker. In 2006, voters sent Carol Shea-Porter to Congress, breaking the exclusive male hold on congressional seats.

New Hampshire’s habit of putting women in office does not mean Clinton will avoid closer scrutiny than male candidates because of her gender. This is the presidency, not the corner office at the State House or the speaker’s chair. Voters are right to ask whether Clinton is tough enough for the job. But males in both the Democratic and Republican fields bear this burden to a lesser degree than she. To overcome it, Clinton must wear an iron mask while also projecting warmth.

The final thoughts from the Concord Monitor:

It is too early in the campaign to know what bumps and jolts will alter its course or which of Clinton’s rivals will grow more formidable.

But from her professional life – one of a small minority of women in her Yale Law School class, the first woman in her law firm – Clinton knows how high she must jump. And from her husband’s electoral experience, she knows New Hampshire.

No woman has ever been in a better position to break the highest glass ceiling in the country.

Share

49 thoughts on “Hillary Clinton To Win

  1. We are deep in the election contest for the Democratic nomination, and we are doing very well. There are many of us who love and support Hillary who see the possibility of a clear path between here and the White House. One thing that I think we might want to consider is what it will mean to have the first woman president. That one demographic variable will earn her a mention in the same breath as the first among all the presidents, George Washington. People don’t think a lot about Millard Fillmore or Zachary Taylor, but they remember firsts because they were first. Moreover, this woman, who makes so few mistakes, will understand the need to reach into history with a highly credible record that speaks well for all women in all years to come. Hold on to your hats: this is going to be one magnificent presidency.

  2. it appears new hamphsire is one of hillary’s strongest states. i feel it will stay that way. iowa is much tougher.

  3. DCDEM – I agree, I think this is going to be an amazing Presidency for Hillary Clinton. I just got done watching a Live event with her in Concord, NH (with Bill sitting on a stool behind her)..and she was so damn good. I get goose bumps watching her, and then I watched all the way until the end of the coverage when she shakes everyone’s hands and she is so genuine. Her staff were telling her she’s late to the next event, but she had a very hard time pulling herself away from the autographing and hand shaking. Peopel were so excited to meet her, and many expressed their hopes that she will win, and that she won’t let them down. She said that she will try her very best, and she really menas that. The theme of her speech was – You don’t have to choose between change and expereince – because she has both. She talked about how you have to stick to you guns to make changes but you also have to work in the system you’re in and build coalitions and sometimes compromise to achieve results. She also talked about how some things you don’t compromise on and those include: A woman’s right to choose, defending our national security while at the same time safeguarding our freedoms, etc…This is a REAL, Committed, Skillful, and Dedicated candidate that is going to be an amazing President.

  4. DCDEM – I agree, I think this is going to be an amazing Presidency for Hillary Clinton. I just got done watching a Live event with her in Concord, NH (with Bill sitting on a stool behind her)..and she was so damn good. I get goose bumps watching her, and then I watched all the way until the end of the coverage when she shakes everyone’s hands and she is so genuine. Her staff were telling her she’s late to the next event, but she had a very hard time pulling herself away from the autographing and hand shaking. Peopel were so excited to meet her, and many expressed their hopes that she will win, and that she won’t let them down. She said that she will try her very best, and she really menas that. The theme of her speech was – You don’t have to choose between change and expereince – because she has both. She talked about how you have to stick to you guns to make changes but you also have to work in the system you’re in and build coalitions and sometimes compromise to achieve results. She also talked about how some things you don’t compromise on and those include: A woman’s right to choose, defending our national security while at the same time safeguarding our freedoms, etc…This is a REAL, Committed, Skillful, and Dedicated candidate that is going to be an amazing President. (Kitsapdem)

  5. CONCORD, N.H. — Hillary Clinton rolled out a new stump speech Sunday as she kicked off September with a two-day campaign swing through New Hampshire and Iowa.

    Accompanied by her husband, former President Bill Clinton, the New York senator sought to undercut her rivals’ charge that she represents a risky return to the past by arguing that she alone has the combination of experience and leadership to produce big changes in both foreign and domestic policy.

    “I know some people think you have to choose between change and experience,” she said. “Well with me you don’t have to choose. I have spent my who life fighting for change.”

    Citing historic legislative victories by former Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Lyndon B. Johnson, Clinton said, “They got big things done because they knew it was not just about the dream, it was about the results and that’s what we’ve got to do again,” she said on the grounds of the state capitol building in Concord. “We need to dream big but then we have to figure out how to get those dreams a reality in the lives of Americans.”

    Playing off the appeals of Barack Obama and John Edwards, she suggested that hope, inspiration and bold blueprints alone will not achieve the goal of changing course. Emphasizing the lessons learned from her nearly seven years in the Senate and her experiences as first lady during her husband’s administration.

    “Over the past 14 years I’ve learned that when you want big changes, you need to build a big consensus,” she said. She added, “Even a president has to get 60 votes in the senate to pass a law, and that is a painstaking roll-up-your-sleeves process that involves a lot of preparation and just plain perspiration.”

    Clinton outlined four big goals for her presidency: restoring America’s leadership in the world, rebuilding the middle-class and the economy, reforming government and “reclaiming our future for our children.”

    In his introduction, Bill Clinton said the Bush administration had reversed many of the policies that had produced record economic growth during the 1990s. Hillary Clinton attacked the administration for producing a “yo-yo society: they pull the strings and expect the rest of us to dance to their tune.”

    Concord was the first of three stops in New Hampshire on Sunday. On Monday, the Clintons will fly to Iowa for rallies in Sioux City and Des Moines.

  6. Hey y’all, I read your excellent post and I don’t doubt for a minute that Hillary is going to have a magnificent presidency. She is running a magnificient campaign. One thing that really impresses me is her bravery- even when others have the “home court” advantage. Remember the Chicago debate at Soldier Field? And goin’ in front of the Daily Kooks convention? Well, standin’ up in those venues and still speaking her truth, I am convinced, is what wins her points. She is very direct, as Kitforhill’s post points out, about what it takes to change this country. I really admire her for sayin’ what she’s NOT willin’ to compromise on. One thing that has always (or at least) almost always been hard for candidates is not pandering to people…telling them what they want to hear. Hillary has so much integrity in this area. She delivers the message and doesn’t twist it or turn it or spin it for whomever she happens to be talkin’ to. That earns a lot of points with me, and I am certain that it has connected with other voters. I am so glad that they are startin to record her interactin with people one on one because everybody who has watched her for years knows that she’s not the “Hillary” that the media makes her out to be. She does care; she is warm. She’s aware, I am sure, that women are often thought “too weak” if they cry or apologize. So she does have a public face. But she always comes across as herself when she’s campaigning and people actually get to see her. –mollyj

  7. Wow,

    Clintons have drawn 4,500 people in NH!

    New Hampshire (Reuters) – For John Hoar, who has been voting in U.S. presidential elections longer than Hillary Clinton has been alive, one of the best reasons to elect her president is that she has seen how the job is done first hand.

    “I have been following her since she showed up here with her husband in 1992. He did a good job as president and so will she,” the 86-year-old Hoar said as he waited to glimpse the New York senator and her husband, former President Bill Clinton.

    The Clintons were back on the campaign trail — she running for the Democratic presidential nomination in the November 2008 election, he drumming up support for her in the early voting state of New Hampshire.

    “Yes, I think she can do it,” Hoar said smiling and echoing Hillary Clinton leading the campaign rally crowd in refrains of “Yes, we can.” on several occasions.

    Leading her Democratic rivals by more than 20 points in most national polls, Hillary Clinton, 59, toured the state where her husband’s second place finish in the 1992 primary helped pave his way to the White House.

    More than 4,500 people showed up in Concord before the Clintons headed off to the state’s fair and then to another rally in Portsmouth

  8. “If you are ready for change, I am ready to lead,” Clinton told the cheering crowd on the state house lawn, promising to restore America’s standing in the world, rebuild the middle class and shatter the glass ceiling by becoming the first woman elected U.S. president.

    “We need to see a woman in the White House. It is about time for the country to accept that,” said Doris Gagne.

    For many of those who turned out to cheer the candidate and her husband, Hillary Clinton’s resume and personality alone is enough to win their votes.

    “She has the best shot to take it all the way,” said Patrick Troy, describing her “experience, determination, guts and drive,” as key ingredients that will get her elected next November.

    But for many, the man standing next to the candidate is an equally big draw, giving Hillary Clinton something extra no other candidate can claim.

    Dressed in white jeans and an open-necked shirt, Bill Clinton looked tanned and relaxed as he was introduced to the crowd as the “husband of the future president of the United States.” He got as much applause as she did.

    “Hillary has someone in the house who can give her a lot of good advice. Bill Clinton knows what to do,” Hoar said.

    For decades, Labor Day weekend has been a time for U.S. politicians to kick off campaigns in earnest and for American families to spend time together. This year, the Clintons followed tradition on both fronts

  9. I am so tired of the argument that Hillary does not represent change. A woman president would demonstrate a radical change in american politics.

  10. Kostner,

    Just to follow up, CBS News just aired video of people lining up around A FULL BLOCK waiting to get into Senator Clinton’s mid-day rally in Concord.

  11. persistent self-promoting claims

    The press originally bought into the narrative of “millions of millions of users and activists” based on inflated hit counts — multiple hits by one user, web spiders, and so on.

    That the most popular poll — the straw poll — attracts only 25K-30K votes should tell you something. Remember, you don’t have to have an account to vote, so non-invested lurkers vote, as well as freepers. What does that say about the netroots army?

    If you generously assume 25k, you are talking about between 50-60 persons per congressional district. And since many spend most of their time typing, they ain’t moving the vote.

  12. ABC News just aired an excerpt from Hillary’s speech in Concord:

    “Change is just a word, without the strength and experience to make it happen”

    As they used to say in the comic books with the delivery of a punch: KA-POW !

  13. i saw meet the press and russert of course mentioned hillary taking money from that arrested fundraiser without mentioning obma taking 7,000 bucks from him. should i be surprized.

  14. I agree…today she gave a masterful, confident speech in NH… great crowd prescence.

    saw it on C-span which will re-air it at 1am EST….for those who want to tape it.

  15. Thanks, MP…I hope that are streaming it so that I can watch the speech. Re the fundraiser: I am gettin’ down right mad about the Hsu money being mentioned without pointin’ out that he also raised money for everybody but god. –mollyj

  16. Hello everyone..

    I watched MTP this am. Carville was extraordinarily kool but the biggest surprise was Mary Matalin. She wasn’t her usual caustic self. She actually made a little sense for a change, maybe she’s seen the light? Advocating for the Neocons takes a strong stomach in light of all the peverts that seem to gravitate towards republicanism.

    Anyway, Carville was a star and backed by Shrum taking control of Matalin’s yada…was one on the most enjoyable pieces I seen on MTP in a very long time.

    I did get a chance to see Hillary in NH but tuned in a little to late to see Prez Clinton… She was radiant, confident and inspiring.The crowd loved her and didn’t want to let her go. She looked great..tanned and rested. Her saffire blue jacket was a standout among the crowd and whoever did her hair, she should keep at her elbow permanently.

    It was a beautiful, sunshiny day for a rally in NH…and dare I say, the day the crowd fell in love with Hillary! I can only hope for a repeat performance for a day like this in Iowa.

    Mrs S.

  17. Joe Friday! Ka-Pow indeed! I am taking that quote over to daily kos and making it part of my signature. Thanks!

  18. Can we ALL use it in our signature lines? It’s a WONDERFUL QUOTE

    “Change is just a word, without the strength and experience to make it happen.”

    I love it!

    I’m glad Carville did a great job today. Also glad to hear that Mary M toned it down. Maybe mellowed with motherhood and advancing age?

    I love the use of the word “strength” in that quote! It captures it! –mollyj

  19. I saw most of the Concord event on C-SPAN but tuned in too late to see Bill. It was great, including the way she mingled among the crowd afterward. She’s a natural!

  20. mollyj: Absolutely! Go to your page at daily kos. Then click the tab that says, “My Profile.” Go down the page to Comments Signature. Insert the text there. Click, “Save All Changes,” just below that (and a touch to the left.”

    Go Hillary!

  21. More Edwards’ ‘pie-in-sky’ plan: Make doctor visits mandatory…

    Democratic presidential hopeful John Edwards said on Sunday that his universal health care proposal would require that Americans go to the doctor for preventive care. … “It requires that everybody be covered. It requires that everybody get preventive care,” he told a crowd sitting in lawn chairs in front of the Cedar County Courthouse. “If you are going to be in the system, you can’t choose not to go to the doctor for 20 years. You have to go in and be checked and make sure that you are OK.” … Edwards said his mandatory health care plan would cover preventive, chronic and long-term health care. The plan would include mental health care as well as dental and vision coverage for all Americans. “The whole idea is a continuum of care, basically from birth to death,” he said. The former North Carolina senator said all presidential candidates talking about health care “ought to be asked one question: Does your plan cover every single American?” “Because if it doesn’t they should be made to explain what child, what woman, what man in America is not worthy of health care,” he said. “Because in my view, everybody is worth health care.” Edwards said his plan would cost up to $120 billion a year, a cost he proposes covering by ending President Bush’s tax cuts to people who make more than $200,000 per year.

  22. Edwards’ SUV flip flop:

    Edwards, who has been criticized by some for calling on Americans to be willing to give up their SUVs while driving one, acknowledged Sunday that he owns a Ford Escape hybrid SUV, purchased within the year, and a Chrysler Pacificia, which he said he has had for years. I think all of us have to move, have to make progress,” he said. “I’m not holyier-than-thou about this. … I’m like a lot of Americans, I see how serious this issue is and I want to address it myself and I want to help lead the nation in the right direction.”

    He said he would not buy another SUV in the future.

  23. Hey Kostner, ‘reckon that hybrid SUV of his makes up for that big carbon footprint of that mansion with the basketball court? For anybody who’s awake, Alegre has a pro-Hillary diary on the recommended list at Daily Kos. Common over the water’s fine. Doesn’t even smell like swill. –mollyj

  24. Read the excellent frontpage story on mydd. hwc, a staunch Hillary supporter wrote a diary of NH rally with a couple of close-up photos…

    Go Hillary..

  25. McGlaughlin Group was all about blogs and new media today. I thought it was behind-the-curve, nothing about the corruption of the netroots or the ‘Animal Farm’ effect. Why is Yearly Kos whiter than the Harvard Club? Why don’t working class and poor Americans look to the netroots for answers? How long would it take John Edwards to dump the netroots and move to the right if he got the nom–after suckering the netroots in the primaries? I’d say less than 24 hours.

    Funny thing, I think the netroots would be okay with Edwards dumping them the day after the Convention–they are a strange sort. But he won’t get the chance because Hil is going to win.

  26. Hey y’all, I stayed up until the wee hours to see the speech as streaming video through CSPAN broadband. I just thought I had seen Hillary at her best before, but this was incredible. That speech truly was magnificant as Mrs. Smith said, and I mean that. It had the sound of an inauguration speech in some parts. Hillary is the one! mollyj

  27. ill Clinton proved a tireless campaigner and an even better tipper yesterday. Although Clinton visited the Hopkinton State Fair yesterday as a cheerleader for his wife Sen. Hillary Clinton – not as a candidate himself – he passed up few chances for connecting with potential voters.

    When the Clintons stopped for apple crisp at the fair (no ice cream for the former president; a la mode for the senator) he chatted with Denise Lemieux, whose family owns the stand. “I mentioned it was a family-run business and my father had passed away in June,” Lemieux said. Clinton’s response: A $50 tip. “He was wonderful. I’m a little at a loss for words,” she said.

    But if the Clintons’ New Hampshire trip – their second joint visit here since Hillary Clinton announced her candidacy for the presidency – allowed them to engage in the sort of one-on-one conversations the state’s presidential primary is known for, it also gave Democrat Hillary Clinton a stage on which to sharpen her political message and separate herself from her rivals.

    In a Democratic primary where numerous candidates are describing themselves as the agents of change, Hillary Clinton simultaneously laid her own claim to the “change” mantle and emphasized the importance of political experience. Speaking before a thousands-strong crowd on the State House lawn yesterday morning, Clinton argued that without insight into the workings of Washington, change will prove elusive.

    “Change is just a word without the strength and experience to make it happen,” she said, speaking from a podium decorated with “Change plus Experience” signs. “And I know some people think you have to choose between change and experience. Well, with me, you don’t have to choose.”

    Increasingly, Hillary Clinton’s message is one of political reality, as she describes the difficulty of shepherding lawmakers toward consensus. Although Hillary Clinton didn’t mention her Democratic rivals by name, yesterday’s comments were the most pointed she’s delivered yet in New Hampshire. They were a clear reference to Illinois Sen. Barack Obama and former North Carolina senator John Edwards, both of whom describe themselves as more prepared to change the political culture.
    But Hillary Clinton stressed the importance of political success, not “rhetoric.” While Edwards and others have decried the Washington establishment, she touted her Washington knowledge and argued that political transformation will only come from working within the system.

    “From my time in the White House and in the Senate, I have learned that you bring change by working in the system established by our Constitution,” Clinton said. “You cannot pretend that the system doesn’t exist.”

    That theme is one Clinton has honed in recent weeks. She frequently refers to the difficulty of garnering the 60 votes necessary to pass legislation in the U.S. Senate and describes the necessity of compromise and bipartisan alliances. Yesterday in Concord, she repeated one of her common lines: “Ultimately to bring change you have to know when to stand your ground and when to find common ground.” She reeled off several issues on which she’s banded together with Republican lawmakers.

    Aside from touting her experience, Clinton assailed President Bush, saying that “our values are under assault by this administration and their ideological allies.” She won applause for saying that “we have to change No Child Left Behind so that it actually works for our teachers and our students” and for calling for an end to the war in Iraq. After visiting Concord, the Clintons left for the Hopkinton State Fair, after which they were headed to a Market Square rally in Portsmouth.

    The address – longer than her normal stump speech – served as the official kickoff to Clinton’s fall campaign. The timing was significant. With school resuming, many voters have returned from vacation and may be tuning in to the presidential race. Some candidates use this season to refocus their political messages.

    And Bill Clinton’s presence helped draw crowds and buzz. More than an hour before the Concord rally began, a line snaked nearly all the way around the State House. The campaign tallied roughly 4,500 attendees, and those who couldn’t find room on the lawn filled Capitol Street. The State House arch served as a backdrop to the podium, and an enormous American flag covered the State House entrance. After the event, the Clintons spent nearly an hour shaking hands and signing autographs.

    After years in the spotlight, Bill Clinton is serving as the warm-up act. Describing why voters should elect his wife, he returned to his own presidential campaign. “A lot of people made fun of me in 1992 when I came here and people were flat on their back and they were hurting and I said ‘I feel your pain,’ ” said Bill Clinton, who took the stage dressed in a pink-and-white checkered shirt. “But I didn’t have the easiest upbringing. I did feel your pain.”

    “You need somebody in the White House who never forgets about you. And it’s easy to forget when you’re president,” Bill Clinton continued.

    “He’s simply beautiful,” Jacqueline Ouellette, of Claremont, said after hearing Bill Clinton speak. “I really believe he’s a kind person. I believe the troubles he had were personal.”

    If a handful of informal interviews were any indication, voters were split on their reasons for attending: Some wanted a glimpse of the former president while others came for the candidate.

    “It was definitely for her that I came today,” said Sarah Murphy of Goffstown. “He was kind of an extra.”

    Whatever the reasons, both speeches – which included references to the economic and foreign policy practices of Bill Clinton’s administration – garnered warm receptions.

    In Hopkinton, where most fairgoers were unaware that the Clintons planned to visit, their arrival was met with exclamations and the clicking of cell phone cameras. It was, it seemed, a historic occasion, and parents and grandparents rushed to show their children the former president and the prominent presidential candidate.

    Jeanne Krukonis of Concord held up her granddaughter, saying, “See that man with the white hair? That’s the man everyone’s trying to see.”

    The Clintons toured the fairgrounds with Gov. John Lynch and Lynch’s wife, Susan. Lynch brought a stream of children over to meet the Clintons and even arranged for Hillary Clinton to sign one teenager’s cast. While Hillary Clinton shook hands and signed autographs, Bill Clinton frequently lagged behind, holding long conversations about pumpkin growing and speaking with 14-year-old Molly Butler about Aurora, her Shropshire ewe.

    Although the Clintons weren’t universally welcomed by fairgoers, many said that they were pleased with Bill Clinton’s leadership and that they looked forward to a second Clinton presidency.

    “I’m going to vote for her: I’ve got three daughters,” said Gerald Gill, who runs Gill Paving in Milford. “Bill did us a good deal.”

  28. I don’t know what’s wrong here. I have difficulty in attaching long article.

    Concord Morning has a wonderful article on Clintons’ showing yesterday.

  29. ill Clinton proved a tireless campaigner and an even better tipper yesterday. Although Clinton visited the Hopkinton State Fair yesterday as a cheerleader for his wife Sen. Hillary Clinton – not as a candidate himself – he passed up few chances for connecting with potential voters.

    When the Clintons stopped for apple crisp at the fair (no ice cream for the former president; a la mode for the senator) he chatted with Denise Lemieux, whose family owns the stand. “I mentioned it was a family-run business and my father had passed away in June,” Lemieux said. Clinton’s response: A $50 tip. “He was wonderful. I’m a little at a loss for words,” she said.

    But if the Clintons’ New Hampshire trip – their second joint visit here since Hillary Clinton announced her candidacy for the presidency – allowed them to engage in the sort of one-on-one conversations the state’s presidential primary is known for, it also gave Democrat Hillary Clinton a stage on which to sharpen her political message and separate herself from her rivals.

    In a Democratic primary where numerous candidates are describing themselves as the agents of change, Hillary Clinton simultaneously laid her own claim to the “change” mantle and emphasized the importance of political experience. Speaking before a thousands-strong crowd on the State House lawn yesterday morning, Clinton argued that without insight into the workings of Washington, change will prove elusive.

    “Change is just a word without the strength and experience to make it happen,” she said, speaking from a podium decorated with “Change plus Experience” signs. “And I know some people think you have to choose between change and experience. Well, with me, you don’t have to choose.”

  30. Increasingly, Hillary Clinton’s message is one of political reality, as she describes the difficulty of shepherding lawmakers toward consensus. Although Hillary Clinton didn’t mention her Democratic rivals by name, yesterday’s comments were the most pointed she’s delivered yet in New Hampshire. They were a clear reference to Illinois Sen. Barack Obama and former North Carolina senator John Edwards, both of whom describe themselves as more prepared to change the political culture.
    But Hillary Clinton stressed the importance of political success, not “rhetoric.” While Edwards and others have decried the Washington establishment, she touted her Washington knowledge and argued that political transformation will only come from working within the system.

    “From my time in the White House and in the Senate, I have learned that you bring change by working in the system established by our Constitution,” Clinton said. “You cannot pretend that the system doesn’t exist.”

    That theme is one Clinton has honed in recent weeks. She frequently refers to the difficulty of garnering the 60 votes necessary to pass legislation in the U.S. Senate and describes the necessity of compromise and bipartisan alliances. Yesterday in Concord, she repeated one of her common lines: “Ultimately to bring change you have to know when to stand your ground and when to find common ground.” She reeled off several issues on which she’s banded together with Republican lawmakers.

    Aside from touting her experience, Clinton assailed President Bush, saying that “our values are under assault by this administration and their ideological allies.” She won applause for saying that “we have to change No Child Left Behind so that it actually works for our teachers and our students” and for calling for an end to the war in Iraq. After visiting Concord, the Clintons left for the Hopkinton State Fair, after which they were headed to a Market Square rally in Portsmouth.

  31. The address – longer than her normal stump speech – served as the official kickoff to Clinton’s fall campaign. The timing was significant. With school resuming, many voters have returned from vacation and may be tuning in to the presidential race. Some candidates use this season to refocus their political messages.

    And Bill Clinton’s presence helped draw crowds and buzz. More than an hour before the Concord rally began, a line snaked nearly all the way around the State House. The campaign tallied roughly 4,500 attendees, and those who couldn’t find room on the lawn filled Capitol Street. The State House arch served as a backdrop to the podium, and an enormous American flag covered the State House entrance. After the event, the Clintons spent nearly an hour shaking hands and signing autographs.

    After years in the spotlight, Bill Clinton is serving as the warm-up act. Describing why voters should elect his wife, he returned to his own presidential campaign. “A lot of people made fun of me in 1992 when I came here and people were flat on their back and they were hurting and I said ‘I feel your pain,’ ” said Bill Clinton, who took the stage dressed in a pink-and-white checkered shirt. “But I didn’t have the easiest upbringing. I did feel your pain.”

    “You need somebody in the White House who never forgets about you. And it’s easy to forget when you’re president,” Bill Clinton continued.

    “He’s simply beautiful,” Jacqueline Ouellette, of Claremont, said after hearing Bill Clinton speak. “I really believe he’s a kind person. I believe the troubles he had were personal.”

    If a handful of informal interviews were any indication, voters were split on their reasons for attending: Some wanted a glimpse of the former president while others came for the candidate.

  32. “It was definitely for her that I came today,” said Sarah Murphy of Goffstown. “He was kind of an extra.”

    Whatever the reasons, both speeches – which included references to the economic and foreign policy practices of Bill Clinton’s administration – garnered warm receptions.

    In Hopkinton, where most fairgoers were unaware that the Clintons planned to visit, their arrival was met with exclamations and the clicking of cell phone cameras. It was, it seemed, a historic occasion, and parents and grandparents rushed to show their children the former president and the prominent presidential candidate.

    Jeanne Krukonis of Concord held up her granddaughter, saying, “See that man with the white hair? That’s the man everyone’s trying to see.”

    The Clintons toured the fairgrounds with Gov. John Lynch and Lynch’s wife, Susan. Lynch brought a stream of children over to meet the Clintons and even arranged for Hillary Clinton to sign one teenager’s cast. While Hillary Clinton shook hands and signed autographs, Bill Clinton frequently lagged behind, holding long conversations about pumpkin growing and speaking with 14-year-old Molly Butler about Aurora, her Shropshire ewe.

    Although the Clintons weren’t universally welcomed by fairgoers, many said that they were pleased with Bill Clinton’s leadership and that they looked forward to a second Clinton presidency.

    “I’m going to vote for her: I’ve got three daughters,” said Gerald Gill, who runs Gill Paving in Milford. “Bill did us a good deal.”

  33. Kostner, that is a terrific article. So much of what you see today tells you more about what the writer wants than what the candidate is all about. With this one you get the feel you are there with the campaign and the narrative voice explains with insight what the candidate is saying, and more importantly what it means. Articles like this one help those who are undecided realize what Hillary is about, discount partisan attacks and understand why it is in the interest of the country that she will be President.

  34. DCDem:

    you stated this in the first post:

    “One thing that I think we might want to consider is what it will mean to have the first woman president. That one demographic variable will earn her a mention in the same breath as the first among all the presidents, George Washington.”

    I would like to add:

    Another First would be: the very First time in US history, a husband and Wife are elected (seperately) to the presidency.

    That fact, in the future, may eclipse a First Woman being elected. Seeing Hillary is a trendsetter! 🙂

    Thanks mollyj..:-)

    Mrs.S.

  35. Terrondt, I am surprised at Russert. I would have thought Big Russ taught him to tell the whole truth. The $7000 Obama accepted from the same fundraiser should definitely been mentioned. From the standpoint of the election rules and simple common sense it is hardly what one might call de minimus. On second thought, I am not surprised.

  36. Hey people! I just wanted to second (or third) that beautiful line of hers:

    ” ‘Change’ is just a word without the strength and experience to make it happen” ‘SNAP!!!! It even got a response from Obama camp, hihi, too funny, must have hurt.

    I read an article over on cnn.com and there was this wonderful comment from a guy named David, a really passionate response which I just want to paste in under.
    It’s a thing of passion and beauty and really sums up a not so commonly voiced reason as to why one should support her. We can paste it everywhere as a response to sexist people(men mostly). And I also like the thought of adding this line as a signature. 🙂

    So here we go: Are You Man Enough to Vote for Hillary Clinton? …..

  37. Gonna see if I can get the whole thing in here. it’s a bit long, but worth reading.

    Are You Man Enough to Vote for Hillary Clinton?

    Hey, Buddy! Yeah, that’s right. I’m talkin’ to you, Mister steak-eating, beer-drinkin, hard-working, fast-living, woman-lovin’, football-playing, tv-watchin’ gun-totin’, truck-drivin’, flag-waving American man. I know who you are. Hell, I’m one of you. I’m 6′4″ 210 pounds of angry right now and I’ve got something that needs sayin’. I’ve been readin’ and watchin’ and listenin’ all about this here election we’ve got comin up and how we might just get ourselves the first woman President of the United States ever, except for a whole bunch of us men are too proud or too macho or too scared to vote for Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton. Now excuse my language, but I think that’s a whole load of grade-A certified bull and I’m about to tell you why.

    We’ve got ourselves a President in there now, claims he’s the man. He’s from up in Connecticut somewheres, but he wears boots and a cowboy hat and he says. “I’m the decider” and “Mission accomplished” and “Bring it on” and all kind of tough guy stuff like that. (Course, back when it was his turn to fight he got his daddy to get him out of it). But nowadays he’s always gettin’ us in fights. That’s my point see: there’s a lot more to being a man than some people think. A real man don’t pick a fight unless he needs to. And when somebody picks a fight with him, he don’t turn around and take it out on somebody else that had nothin’ to do with it. A real man don’t give one reason before he does something, and another one after. He don’t lie to the folks he’s supposed to be helpin’. He don’t spend the children’s money on presents for his rich friends. He don’t give his buddies big important jobs they can’t do. He don’t leave poor folks stuck up on a rooftop in the rain. He don’t go on vacation when things get rough. I could keep on, but that’s all history now. It’s time to pick a new President, and everybody and their brother is runnin’ ‘round sayin’ how they’re the man for the job.

    Rudy Giuliani says he’s the man. He talks real tough, too. (Course, sometimes he does like to put on a dress and go to the opera, but that’s his business). He used to talk far-left but now he talks far-right. Mostly he just talks big about himself. He’s about the bragginest man I ever did see. He says he’s a hero and he says it every chance he gets. But I figure a real man don’t take credit for other folks bein’ heroes. He don’t say one thing in New York City and another in Iowa.. A real man stands by his people and his family and his word. So I don’t think Rudy is the man.

    Mitt Romney says he’s the man. He’s rich and he’s handsome and he talks real pretty, too.
    (Course, he does kind of talk out of both sides of his mouth). Romney’s got more opinions than a Sunday newspaper on both sides of every issue. He’s liberal up in Boston and conservative down in Des Moines. He tells his boys the way to serve their country in time of war is to get him elected. He was one of them what-you-call corporate raiders, kinda like a rustler only in a business suit. He got himself rich in by runnin’ down companies, firin’ Americans, and shippin’ their jobs overseas. Now I reckon a real man don’t make his living selling out hard-working folks. He don’t say one thing on the east coast and another in the heartland. A real man stands for what he believes even if it costs him. Course, he’s got to believe in something, first. So I don’t think Romney is the man.

    Fred Thompson says he’s the man. He’s big and he’s gruff and he’s got a deep manly voice, alright. He wants us to go fight, but when it was his turn he got himself a deferment. Mostly he just pretends to stand for what’s right on a television show. (He’s pretty good on that one). Course, in the real world he only fought for mining companies, and tobacco companies, and asbestos companies and some foreign dictator. And when old Fred got up in the U.S. Senate he didn’t do much of anything. Nowadays, while we’re all talkin’ about the war and important stuff, he’s busy pickin’ on gay folks. He’s talkin’ pro-life, but he lobbied pro-choice. He talks a whole bunch, but he don’t say much. Anyways, I guess a real man don’t make his livin’ protectin’ poison pushers.. He don’t say one thing for money and another for votes. A man’s got to BE a man, he can’t just ACT like one. So I don’t think Fred is the man.

    Now Senator Clinton, she don’t claim to be no kind of man. She’s proud to be a woman and a wife and a mother, and she says stuff like “It takes a village to raise a child”and “I’m your girl”. She’s all for clean air and health care and wussy stuff like that. Probably wants us to eat our vegetables. But she stands by her man when times get tough, and she raised her daughter right. She takes care of old folks and sick folks and poor folks and little children who need help. (She even bakes cookies sometimes, but I don’t think she’s much good at it). What she is good at is fighting for America. She’s been doing that her whole life. She fights for what she believes as good as any man. And she’s been in plenty of fights, believe you me. They’ve been comin’ after her for years with cameras and money and lawyers and lies, but Hillary just keeps fightin’ back, and winnin’, too. She even stands up to the President. (Course she’s had some practice doin’ that). You just watch her in them debates. Watch the way them other guys treat her. They’re powerful men, Senators and Governors and such, but they all treat Hillary like she’s their boss. She’s got those old boys so mixed up they’re gettin’ $400 haircuts. They’re talkin’ ‘bout bombin’ our friends and askin’ our enemies to supper. Meanwhile, Senator Clinton just stands there cool as a cucumber and watches ‘em squirm. She’s not just the frontrunner, she’s the leader.

    Now I know some of you boys out there are scared of a strong woman. (You don’t like to admit it, but you know it’s true). Hell, I love women and they scare me, too. But let me ask you this: if Hillary’s got you runnin’ scared, how do you think Osama bin Laden and his buddies are gonna feel? Because she’s going to go after them terrorists like a momma bear protecting her cubs. There ain’t nothin’ more fearsome than an American woman riled up about something, and you know I’m right on that one, boys. Like her or not, you’ve never seen Hillary Clinton back down to nobody, never. She stands her ground and she fights. That’s just the kind of woman she is. And that’s the kind of President we need right now. Even if she isn’t the man.

    So listen up, boys. I know what you’re thinking: Do I feel secure enough? But being as this is the most powerful country in the world, and things could blow clean up any minute, you’ve got to ask yourself a question: Are you man enough to vote for Hillary Clinton?
    Posted By David, Salinas, CA : September 2, 2007 5:47 pm

Comments are closed.